Tag Archives: TTT

Top Ten Tuesday – Mardi Gras

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is: Purple, Yellow, and/or Green Book Covers (in honour of Mardi Gras). I’ve already written a post on purple book covers, so I’ve chosen some books that I’ve read with yellow and green covers.

Top Ten Tuesday – Christmas books


Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is a Christmas freebie topic, so I picked 10 of the Christmas books I’ve read this year in an attempt to distract me from the depressing COVID and Brexit news.

These books have done the job of distracting me but none of them is brilliant and I can’t really recommend any very highly. However, easily the best of them are ‘A Surprise Christmas Wedding’ by Phillipa Ashley, ‘A Wedding in December’ by Sarah Morgan and ‘Comfort and Joy’ by India Knight. By far the worst is ‘The Christmas Train’ by David Baldacci which infuriated me no end with constant descriptions of women’s weight and appearance; judgements which of course are not equally applied to the male characters. You can definitely tell it’s written by a man.

Top Ten Tuesday: long book titles

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is ‘super long book titles’. I picked the 10 longest I could spot from the books I’ve read.

  1. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
  2. The Death and Life of Charlie St Cloud
  3. The Girl with a Clock for a Heart
  4. The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ
  5. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
  6. I’d Tell You I Love You, but Then I’d Have to Kill You
  7. The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight
  8. The Ocean at the End of the Lane
  9. The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society
  10. One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

Top Ten Tuesday: Autumnal book covers

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is ‘book covers with fall colours/vibes’. I picked some which stood out from the books I’ve read.

Bonus, for autumnal books, you can’t beat the gorgeous illustrations in Jill Barklem’s Bradley Hedge book ‘Autumn Story’.

I love autumn! It’s my absolute favourite time of the year.

Top Ten Tuesday – longest books

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is ‘the longest books I’ve read’. I thought this was going to be tricky but then I discovered a nifty filter on Goodreads which let me sort books I’ve read by their number of pages. I don’t think I’ve recorded every book I’ve ever read on Goodreads, but I think this list is probably pretty complete. The page counts come from Goodreads too.

1. The Lord of the Rings Trilogy by JRR Tolkien (1,137 pages)

2. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon (850 pages)

3. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by JK Rowling (766 pages)

4. Breaking Dawn by Stephenie Meyer (756 pages)

5. Brisingr by Christopher Paolini (748 pages)

6. City of Heavenly Fire by Cassandra Clare (733 pages)

=7. Moby Dick by Herman Melville (720 pages) Felt like 7200 pages!

=7. The Given Day by Dennis Lehane (720 pages)

9. A Fraction of the Whole by Steve Toltz (711 pages)

10. The Glass Lake by Maeve Binchy (704 pages)

Top Ten Tuesday – great books not to reread

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is ‘books I loved but will never reread’. As far as I’m concerned, there’s too many books and too little time in this life to reread books unless they are truly exceptional, so I could fill this list with almost every adult book I’ve ever enjoyed. Therefore, I’ve tried to think of books I love but wouldn’t want to reread for a particular reason.

  1. Before I Go to Sleep by SJ Watson – creepy subject matter and probably less of a thrill when you know the twists ahead.
  2. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold – not really a subject matter I want to revisit, though it’s beautifully told.
  3. The Cider House Rules by John Irving – just in case I didn’t love it as much the second time around because it was perfect the first time.
  4. Into the Darkest Corner by Elizabeth Haynes – disturbing subject matter.
  5. Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger – I enjoyed it but it was weird.
  6. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon – loooong and if I really wanted to revisit it I could watch the TV series.
  7. The Kind Worth Killing by Peter Swanson – I know how it ends now.
  8. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak – not sure I could take being that destroyed by a book again.
  9. Bel Canto by Ann Patchett – in case I didn’t love it as much knowing that I found the very end slightly disappointing.
  10. Eragon by Christopher Paolini – it would probably be marred by how boring I found the subsequent books in the series.

Top Ten Tuesday – Spring TBR

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly feature hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s theme is books on my Spring to be read list. These are my NetGalley ARCs I’m planning to read this Spring.

  1. Mad Blood Stirring by Simon Mayo
  2. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
  3. White Houses by Amy Bloom
  4. How I Lose You by Kate McNaughton
  5. Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout
  6. Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
  7. Two Steps Forward by Graeme Simsion and Annie Buist
  8. The Dreams of Bethany Mellmoth by William Boyd
  9. Mudbound by Hillary Jordan
  10. The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

Top Ten Tuesday – Favourite book quotes

It’s been a while but I really want to get back into Top Ten Tuesdays which I discover is now hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s topic is Favourite Book Quotes which is a difficult one as I don’t have good recall for quotes from books. So I’ve looked up some of my favourite books and tried to find good quotes from them.

1. amberFrom The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman. This was one of the readings at my wedding so it was the only quote that came instantly to mind for this topic.

“I’ll be looking for you, Will, every moment, every single moment. And when we do find each other again, we’ll cling together so tight that nothing and no one’ll ever tear us apart. Every atom of me and every atom of you… We’ll live in birds and flowers and dragonflies and pine trees and in clouds and in those little specks of light you see floating in sunbeams… And when they use our atoms to make new lives, they wont’ just be able to take one, they’ll have to take two, one of you and one of me, we’ll be joined so tight…”

2.husband From The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty. This quote jumped out at me so much, it struck such a bell with me. I thought that not working would give me the opportunity to stop having to talk to people all the time and found that as a mother you’re required to talk to even more people than you do at work!

“The other mothers, the teachers, the people. I didn’t realize that having a child was so social. You’re always talking to people.”

3. operaFrom The Rainbow Opera by Elizabeth Knox. This sums me up perfectly!

“I have no particular plan in life – and that’s something I rather like. Most things that people do seem to me to be rather dull and silly. In my ideal life I’d be left alone to read”

A Fraction of the Whole

4. From A Fraction of the Whole by Steve Toltz

“Sometimes not talking is effortless, and other times it’s more exhausting than lifting pianos.”

5. ciderFrom The Cider House Rules by John Irving

“What is hardest to accept about the passage of time is that the people who once mattered the most to us wind up in parentheses.”

A spool of blue thread6. From A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler. I could have picked a million Anne Tyler quotes, she writes so brilliantly about life, love, death and family.

“You know how you just have to touch your child, sometimes? How you drink him in with your eyes and you could stare at him for hours and you marvel at how dear and impossibly perfect he is?”

7.kevin From We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver

“I realize it’s commonplace for parents to say to their child sternly, ‘I love you, but I don’t always like you.’ But what kind of love is that? It seems to me that comes down to, ‘I’m not oblivious to you – that is, you can still hurt my feelings – but I can’t stand having you around.’ Who wants to be loved like that? Given a choice, I might skip the deep blood tie and settle for being liked. I wonder if wouldn’t have been more moved if my own mother had taken me in her arms and said, ‘I like you.’ I wonder if just enjoying your kid’s company isn’t more important.”

8Atonement. From Atonement by Ian McEwan

“The cost of oblivious daydreaming was always this moment of return, the realignment with what had been before and now seemed a little worse. ”

The Family Fang9. From The Family Fang by Kevin Wilson

“What you’ll find, I think, is that the things you most want to avoid are the things that make you feel the greatest when you actually do them.”

10. remainsFrom The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro. Sums up the beauty of British landscapes beautifully.

“I would say that it is the very lack of obvious drama or spectacle that sets the beauty of our land apart. What is pertinent is the calmness of that beauty, its sense of restraint. It is as though the land knows of its own beauty, of its own greatness, and feels no need to shout it.”