Review of ‘Before the Fall’ by Noah Hawley

imageThanks to Hodder and Stoughton, Bookbridgr and NetGalley for the ARC of this book.

I was really excited to get the opportunity to read this book as I’ve enjoyed Noah Hawley’s TV work on Fargo and Legion. I think he’s a really talented storyteller and how on Earth does he find the time to work on so many quality projects?

This book did not disappoint. It’s a really well-written suspenseful story with strong treatises on wealth and how the media covers certain news stories. It’s rare for a page turner to take such strong standpoints on social issues and this brings depth to what could be a quite a lightweight story.

The novel starts with a private plane crashing into the sea with two survivors, a painter who hitched a lift at the last minute and the 4 year old son of the plane’s millionaire owner. The book follows these two characters, both of whom I really liked, ┬áin the aftermath of the crash and highlights how they are treated by the investigating authorities and the media. It also relates the lead up to the crash from the perspective of each of passengers and crew members who died in the crash.

It’s very cleverly written let down only slightly by the final reveal of the reason why the plane crashed being a bit trivial and underwhelming. However, I may also have found it marred if it had revealed some big dramatic conspiratorial reason why the plane crashed. There was probably no completely satisfying ending to this kind of book. It’s often the case with whodunnit style books, the pleasure is in the reading rather than the ending which can never live up to all the possible conclusions you’ve imagined along the way.

I’d totally recommend reading this book and I’m looking forward to reading more of Hawley’s books in the future. I think I have The Good Father in my Audible library.

Review of ‘Leaving Time’ by Jodi Picoult

Leaving TimeThanks to Bookbridgr and Hodder and Stoughton for the ARC of this book.

Warning – this review may spoil the book!

I used to read a lot of Jodi Picoult and then I took a break because they were starting to get a bit repetitive and less impactful. I really enjoyed the first half of this book; it didn’t feel like Picoult’s usual style (moral dilemma, big twist that reveals different person is to blame than you would expect); it was more like a Harlan Coben style mystery – missing people, family secrets, hidden past etc. Then came the enormous supernatural Sixth Sense style big twist which I hated and which ruined the book for me.

What made me want to read this book is that I’d heard it had quite a lot of elephant behavioural science in it which I thought would be interesting. In fact, I found these sections the least interesting bit of the book. The bit I enjoyed was the sections set in the present where a 13 year girl called Jenna employs a psychic and a PI to investigate what happened to her mother Alice, the elephant behavioural scientist, who went missing 13 years earlier. I was willing to suspend my disbelief while the psychic stuff was just a bit of a character background gimmick, but the last third of the book goes full on with the psychic stuff and I lost all interest. Usually Picoult’s big twists are quite clever but the one in this book is just ridiculous. It spoilt the book which would have been much more engaging if it had been routed in reality.

What a shame, I was ready to give Jodi Picoult a second chance but on the strength of this book I won’t be reading any more of her books any time soon.